Jan 9, 2009

A Barrel of Honky Fun

















Yesterday was a good day.

Manthony and I hung out, and did what we do best: shrug, whatever. I like this about Manthony, because I never know where we'll end up. First we meandered around Seattle: checked out the Frye Museum, insulted some ugly children who were featured in an art installation, and lazily flipped through expensive magazines at the Barnes&Noble downtown. We ended up at Dragonfish for Happy Hour where we inhaled some spring rolls, and washed them down with two orders of sushi. That is the second thing we do best together: eat. The third is probably talking shit, which we always do with excellence.

Once home, we headed back out with friends from the apartment building. We walked to Lucid, the new neighborhood lounge and my new favorite place to hang. Happy Hour is from 6PM-10PM, there's no cover, the music is good, the space is comfortable, and the owner is super cool. I think he said he's Haitian. Our group grabbed a pitcher of the Irish Death (!!!) and kicked back for an hour. I was sorry to leave when the band started playing, because I could have hung out all night; it's a really chill space. Check it out if you're ever in the U-District.

We left and met up with more people at The Little Red Hen, a SERIOUS country bar close to our place. I've been for their popular karaoke night, but last night was dancing only. And wow, did people dance! As usual, I was the only brown person in the joint, because--well, because it's a country bar. It was like a dance camp for honkies. A-Train and I tried dancing--me, a dark, shuffling iceberg of a person, and him, a sprightly stick of a white guy--but we just pissed the natives off by bumping into them an' their kind. My neighbor, Michelle, invited her boss--I now think of him as The Hot Boss--and they were having a VERY. GOOD. TIME. I'm not going to blame all of the crazy shots they were doing, but I'm fairly sure the phrase "I'm never drinking again" is going to come out of her mouth later, when she finally regains consciousness. I met an old timer named Jimmy, who looked like an 80-year old Skeletor with feathered, David Cassidy hair--and talked with the only gay couple in the place. One of them was wearing a hot pink, ruffly tuxedo shirt with diamond-encrusted cuff links (I got the feeling this was an understated look for him), and the other was wearing a turquoise number that can only be described as 'honky chic.' Fun was had by all.

Today I kind of maybe sorta totally pooped my pants when I saw that Heather Armstrong, of dooce.com fame (and flipping you off in the photo above), is coming to Seattle (Bothell, really) on her book tour. POOPED, I tell you. I'm so going.

Also, the big news just broke: I wonder who is going to buy the Seattle P.I. now that it's up for sale. Paul Allen, maybe? And then he'll buy the rest of Seattle, and turn it into Allentown. I'm thinking good thoughts for all of my friends employed by the P.I.--hang in there!

Hm. This was a meandering post....

18 comments:

Manthony said...

I wonder if the P-I can make it as a web-only news outlet?

Also, I guess paper copies of The Stranger cost a lot because it is printed in Yakima and trucks couldn't get over the pass. So they reprinted at the Seattle Times facility in Kent.

Joanna said...

OMG. Can I go with you when Heather comes to town?? I've been following her blog since 2006 and I would LOVE to meet her in person!!!

Snotty McSnotterson said...

Manthony, I didn't know that about the Stranger. BLEH, KENT.

Snotty McSnotterson said...

Joanna, for sure! We have to buy her book and read it and laugh and cry and die first. Tuesday March 31st at 7pm at Third Place Books in Bothell. The turnout is going to be huge, I'm getting there early.

Joanna said...

Deal. I get off at 5pm so I can meet you right afterwards! Let's do this!

Snotty McSnotterson said...

I'm wondering what to do to get her attention... flash her? Maybe burn a flag in the bookstore? I dunno.

Joanna said...

We could make a bacon/cheese statue in her likeness!

Snotty McSnotterson said...

This is a good idea.

Anonymous said...

You are too hilarious. Too.

-Geoff

Snotty McSnotterson said...

You mean it's honkilarious.

matt said...

After 20 years at the P-I, my mom had to find out on the local news last night. Shameful.
Shaaaaaaameful.
And some bigwig from Hearst came in today to "brief" everyone, and basically showed up, gave them TWO MINUTES to get into the conference room, and told the they're screwed.
God bless America.

Snotty McSnotterson said...

Sorry to hear that, yo. It's going to be interesting to see what they end up doing.

M.W.S. said...

I will probably be losing my job to this fiasco as well--although I'm surprised a lot of people didn't see it coming. Print media is struggling everywhere, did people think we'd get a bailout or something? HAH!

Snotty McSnotterson said...

Yeah, I was surprised at some of my friends' reactions when they heard. I was like, have you been on the internet lately? I knew this was coming last year, and told a couple of them LAST YEAR that they should start blogging or doing niche-reporting or anything... it fell on deaf ears. I feel bad for all of them, but hope that they're kicking it into high gear and getting their names out there into the employment ether.

Manthony said...

I was speaking about the paper copies of The Stranger this week specifically. I should have said that.

And Kent is rather bleh. But so is Yakima.

matt said...

Well, from what I've heard, peeps at both papers have been waiting for the shoe to drop for a while (and my sources tell me that this by-no-means should be interpreted as "The Times wins"-they're up shit creek too, they just haven't been closed by a mega-entity like Hearst).
The shock has come from the way in which all this has been handled (or not-handled?).
And it seems like the P-I folks at least know the knife's in their back. The Times people are still like Damocles.

I know a bunch of people have been all "duh, wake up and smell the internet," but as much as I see the 'net as a usefull tool and an addictive entertainment, the tangibility of a newspaper, and the deep relevence it has for modern civilization cannot be undelined too-strongly. I think the collapses of papers around the country have been bodyblows to American intelligence and literacy from which we may never recover.

matt said...

^_^

blah-blah-blah.

Snotty McSnotterson said...

Wow. That was like a thesis paper. I am just going to agree with whatever you said, since you're clearly smarter than me! :)